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environment in place. we had cyber hackers come in now up to two years to stool these coins. not only do they steal customer le 100,000 they sto coins from the owner specifically. >> what do you think is the likelihood that these people will ever get their money back? there is no regulation? there are no laws? why should they? dory.t is the fed assumes there's no consumer protection whatsoever and without the consumer protection, these investors could lose everything. most probably they have lost everything. bitcoin itself is untraceable. once these transactions are done, they are irreversible. it is anonymous. it is hard to track down the criminals. it is hard to get the money back. , i'm noto seems to me a lawyer by any means, establishing standing, the most basic legal principle that any suit has to go through, is virtually impossible because of the way bitcoin is designed it so there is no location and place. that is correct. there's no legal structure over the top of it as well as any sort of regulation over it. the chance of getting money back is quite low. what is very interesting
of standards and we also see that there is no control environment in place. we had cyber hackers come in for up to two years to steal these coins buried not only did they still customer coins, but they still 100,000 coins specifically from the owner of gox. >> what is the likelihood that these people will ever get their money back? there is no regulation and there are no safeguards so why should they? >> right, that is the sad story. there is no consumer protection whatsoever. without that protection, these investors could lose everything. most probably they have lost everything. bitcoin itself is not traceable. once these transactions are done, they are irreversible. it's anonymous so clearly is hard to track down the culprits and it is hard to get the money back. seems that the most basic legal principle is virtually impossible because of the weight bitcoin is operating. there is no location in place for such currency. >> that's correct. there is no legal structure over the top of it as well as any sort of regulation over it. the chance of getting money act is quite low. what's interesting ab
they are thriving in this environment? >> yes. >> these black-and-white lemurs like their food so much so that -- i will admit it made me a bit uncomfortable to say the least. thankfully, the giant galapagos tortoises don't get as excited about mealtime. in fact, they can live months without food. this one is 30 years old. new 18 becausee she will live to be 200. ofnson has spent hundreds thousands of dollars on animal conservation. in addition to torres and lemurs, a shelter some rare birds. >> this one here was born blind and they are hand feeding him. he's doing very well. right there. the scarlet ibis was once native to this area of the caribbean. by the time richard moved here, there wasn't a single one left. >> i figure because they were so beautiful, they were killed for their feathers and disappeared. >> but richard branson has big plans for them. >> once we have enough here, they will start moving out to other islands and hopefully the british virgin islands it will have scarlet ibis and flamingos in all the ponds. >> but if i were an animal here, i would never leave. >> don't do that. >>
regulatory environment, it is very difficult for banks to josep juy taking a risk if it defaults and it will take them three years to resolve that situation. in states like california, lender can get sued by a defaulted bar were for making a relatively minor error in the servicing or lending process. a lot of risks. >> the regulatory environment is not helping. what should the regulatory environment be? you have to have some rules. >> some of the rules were put in place that are very good. contact for the bar were. putting in place a really normative standard for making a loan. disclosure. all the things you heard about during the crisis. >> what about for the banks? agree -- we totally don't need to see the new agency that came out of the dodd frank law telling the banks with the price of mortgages ought to be. we should not have legislated the way that prepayment penalties work. as a low credit score bar were its mortgage come your score goes up immediately. another lender will come in and refinance you. that first lender will lose money. they're not going to do that. >> mark f
the next few quarters, driving profitability as well. number three, the environment as a whole, it seems that investors continue to discount the upside and are very cautious. we will not see returns like 2013, but we are still bullish as a whole. >> in the last conference call we kept hearing about companies guiding downwards. so much m&a. how do you account for that? >> that is a concern, not everything is rosy and perfect, but there are concerns out there and you have seen an environment over the last few years where every quarter they learn a is part of thech regulatory environment that we are in. they overpromise and underdeliver and could potentially be on the hook for money. it down. which is not to say that you should ignore these things. you want to look at it. but you need to do your homework and look at what is happening in terms of corporate earnings. generally speaking, and our view, if the company continues to take market share away from competitors in in industry that continues to grow, they must reflect in the numbers at some point. maybe not this quarter or the next quart
you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
an additional grievance to talk about on social media. theoon as he lost information environment, he began to bleed supporters. when that happened, use on acceleration of the opposition. >> the media's first focused on the terrible and tragic deaths of roughly 78 people in the square but the real story was the loss of political support by virtue of being connected to the internet. >> the me talk about the whole new prize you are offering. explain that. the whole book is about how the internet can solve global problems. how will be a factor in the do come forward to this million dollar prize. i am literally putting my money where my mouth is. >> this is your money. >> this is a personal donation. google is doing things in this area and many are, as well. there are a series of problems -- empowerment of individuals, anti-censorship, illicit trafficking in illicit networks. technologies can be used to make those worse or better. i personally want to fund the people who are trying to make the problems better for citizens. there are plenty of heroes, we want to find them all. look at africa, fo
of president obama. he is governing in a difficult environment. is there one or two lessons he could learn from those radius presidencies? previous presidencies? >> he is trying hard. he has an awful situation. the republican party is terribly divided. it is terribly divided, so they spend much of their time fighting each other. to mess't have the time with democrats. >> there is not much he can do? >> he is trying. i think the staff that he has is good. but, they are not doing enough to get close to the congress. they are doing better. it is going to take a long time to get over and get past that point. , the taskke too long -- there is no task remaining until he is out of the door. >> you have said your favorite speaker was sam rayburn. a few questions. tip o'neill. >> a wonderful guy. everybody loved him. both republicans, democrats. was a good speaker. another irishman was a great one. john mccormick. of rayburn.rotÉge mentor of tip o'neill. succession.derful understood how the place should work and how people could work together. >> on the other side, newt gingrich. >> newt gingrich is a
, talks were dominated by a cooling economy and rising concerns about the environment. tom, manufacturing pmi over the weekend fell slightly. is that a sign of the reaction of weakening growth? is a bit of both. at pmi trajectory came in 50.2, down from 50.5 in january. so it is still slightly above the 50 mark, which is improving from deteriorating conditions. deceleration in the manufacturing sector. the big question is is this to do with february, which this year had the chinese new year holiday, or is it a reflection -- a reflection of genuine problems in the manufacturing sector? pmi?at is the reaction to has rebranded to past 55 from the record low of 53 in january. theome evidence that in domestic economy, and the services sector, it is actually doing slightly better. yuan hasrse, the weakened significantly over concerns. have the npc kicking off this week. what does this mean for the government's broader growth strategy? >> one of the concerns is that a weakening yuan is a reflection of lower investor confidence in china. be deliberate strategy by the people's bank of china. they
the internet as we travel around in the mobile environment. it is critical. nothing works without the internet. they are still transitioning us from voice services or sms on plans. >> on the internet, what is happening with companies like facebook and whatsapp is that people are specializing. whatsapp took what people are doing and specializing to only doing messaging. nothing goes badly. carriers specialize in delivering ip quickly for voice and video services. they start doing fewer things, but doing them better. that is the trend. >> if i were a european carrier, i would say something is going badly when voxer gets all of my customers voice calls and texting and whatsapp -- >> even the carriers would agree with that. >> we are providing more services than before. we provide reliable message delivery, voice and video services, photo and video sending. what you are getting is the data plan. it is a $100 million company. they want the good parts. they want the good parts about the bad parts. that is not a reasonable way to analyze the trade-off. >> what do you think of mark zuckerberg's idea o
preference will be huge. what we're going to get to is that cars will support multiple environments through standard connections. it will likely be wi-fi from what i am reading about this announcement. this is something i think drivers have wanted for a very long time. why did it take so long to get to this point? why did it take so long to get to this deal with apple? on the phonerts makers decided to find an interface which allows the car to remotely control the phone. we are not just talking about rejecting what you see on your smart phone and have a read-only. we are talking about the bidirectional interface which to operatedriver features which are on the phone and use the phone as a computer. this interface needs to be well thought through. it is in the hands of the phone producer to define this interface. on the mutual investigations, i think we have found a very good and very compelling offer. >> final thought. >> it is also interesting that we just saw video showing how this works. they're opening this up to other apps as well. it is an opportunity for other companies likes bod spo
environment. it brings much greater value to our customers. >> there have been very successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems quite good. why not take advantage of that now? >> is more than about the short-term money. about building something great to last year look at our customers. 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is whipping in the win for us is the tremendous it -- return on investment our customers are getting. john will be speaking at our momentum conference. 150 countries and on average, they saved $30 per document and have reduced their turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is when you're at a public company, there is a pressure to focus on the quarter is focusing on the ground game and not the long ball. is that what happens still at public companies? >> i think it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers, and our partners, as public to when you are a company and you focus on quarter after quarter after quarter. we are taking ad
of strategic partners. that is fundamental to our strategy. to thrive in a heterogeneous environment. been successful tech ipos recently. the environment seems good. why not take advantage? >> it is more than about the short-term money. it is about building something great to last. we look at our customers -- have 95,000 customers large and small. we are putting 40,000 unique users on a day. this is what we're focused on. the thing that is really whipping the wind for us is the tremendous return on investment that our customers are getting. john henshaw will be speaking at our momentum conference. he is with hp. save $30erage, they per document and have reduce turnaround time by 21 days. >> it sounds like what you're hinting at is that when you are at a public of any is that there is a pressure to focus on the you areand that focusing on the ground game, not the long ball. is that what happens at public companies? >> it allows our entire leadership team to focus on our customers and on our partners as opposed to when you are a public company and you are focused on quarter after quarter aft
expanding. the markets are going to find the environment stuff. what is the concern china or deflation? >> i don't think there will be deflation and i think we will see a long time of low growth. i don't think inflation will be a problem. of alarm also it's bells and i like to put the word demand in front of deflation. and thatalling wages means following command and a negative spiral. it is not just falling prices. is lots of sectors. you see groups and things like that. falling realu have wages that that is the problem. the cycle that japan went through and if you do not touch it at the right time, it is difficult to turn around. are we in a scenario like that? deflation and the specter of it hanging over us unless handled correctly. >> one of the characteristics of japan that contributed to the slow growth was a rapidly-aging population and people having a lower propensity to consume. that changed the balance of growth in the economy. there are european economies that have rapidly aging populations and it appears to be a social issue and an issue that has a profound economic impact and lo
on there. it's a different environment than it was in 2005 or 2006. i would hesitate to say it's over. i think you have to be careful about that. >> whenever i'm in new york, i hear about silicon alley. you hear about, this is the new silicon valley in texas. why is silicon valley continuing to draw the best and brightest? >> is a network effect. if you look at five companies come $5 billion in tech from silicon valley, and you name five in new york, it's hard to find although new york is doing well. it's a network effect. if you're a world-class engineer , where should you go? the overwhelming answer is result,valley, and as a all of the best executives are in silicon valley, or all the ones who know how to scale companies are in silicon valley. there's a predominant amount of money in silicon valley and so forth and the culture itself is very conducive to building companies. all those things combined to make silicon valley a very strong network. it's kind of like hollywood. digital cameras, how hard is it to make a movie? you can make a movie in idaho. but even getting the best key gri
-quarter revenue. "turbo" were disappointing. this is the most competitive feature environment he's ever seen. they will withdraw world cup t-shirts after they complained it a link to the country with sexual activity. the world's largest --second-largest sports company said they were only available in the u.s.. >> 643 a.m. in london. brazil is also the king of car crime, bad news for owners but makerews for the israeli of car tracking devices reporting record earnings largely thanks to brazil's auto theft explosion. middle eastern attic or elliott gotkine has more. with theen speaking chief executive? >> their biggest market thanks to this explosion of auto theft, brazil is just as important. of 10,000 vehicles are stolen, 40% worse than the second worst country, south africa. the chief executive says it will continue to be a very good market for them. very attractive to us because of two main reasons. brazil is becoming a more western company. more insurance companies are involved in more car manufacturers are involved. more people are using cars. on the other hand, still emerging markets. ,
a better environment. >> why? so many companies run so poorly? >> i think you have a market that is fair value, plus or minus. it is not overshadowed particularly. corporate are healthy. financials are well capitalized. interest rates are low. company balance sheets are filled with cash. private equities trading over one billion dollars. unclogged capital commitments. ironically in environment where you have low growth means that they are much more receptive to value trading ideas. that lends itself to a very fertile environment for what we do. take one case example. yesterday you filed a 13 tnd with one of your companies, huge, employees 60,000 people. you want to talk to the board about pretty much everything, right? management, capital structure, other stuff. what ultimately are you trying to achieve here you go -- achieve here you go -- achieve here? several pretty much everything. >> is there that much wrong with the company? >> there are a lot of things right with the company. but all of those things you articulated -- i'm very confident we will be able to work things out amicably.
is they actually know who you are in a banking environment without having to use a password, just based on .our bio metric interaction they came to us and it was competitive. putting $3 million together and the way it works is we aggregate the investors who go on to our site and see a presentation from the company and watch a rep -- webinar, and they decide and start from $10,000 up. you can try to pick the next whatsapp. it is critical to mention you have got to build a portfolio. this stuff is so risky. you have to diversify. if you do not have 5, 10, or 15 of the companies, you're not doing it right. today ormpany started even in the last few years, do you see their equity strategy as acquisitions or going the ipo route? >> people always prefer ipo because you can build real value and continue building the company. an ipo is another funding event to raise money and better valuation so you continue to build value. most ipos are not showing several others -- selling shareholders. there are a lot of them in israel. 800 are bought for each woman goes public. we have a lot of companies traded in new
. >> would you say they are thriving? >> arriving in this environment in the environment? yes. >> it made me a bit uncomfortable, to say the least. giant tortoises do not get as excited about meal time. in fact, they can live months without food. this one is 30 years old. 30 may be the new 18 because she will live to 200. ransom spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on animal conservation. in addition, he shelters rare birds. >> this was warned blind. hand feeding him. doing very well. there.e one right this was once native to this area of the caribbean. by the time richard moved here, not a single one left. >> i think because they are so beautiful, they were killed. >> richard branson has a plan for them. >> once we have enough here, they will start having to other islands. hopefully the british virgin islands will have the flamingos and all the ponds. >> if i were an animal, i would never leave. >> don't do that. i did not like it when all of the lemurs were crawling all over me. they have nails. were climbing up my legs. >> if he is successful, and you are talking about the crimson bird,
agitating these days. stay with us because i want to ,alk about the deal environment this onslaught of investor activism we are seeing. sweeneynging in paul and merger arbitrage strategist. let's start with joseph a bank in this saga that is going on in the men's retail sector. it is interesting they seem to be going back-and-forth. ultimately, who wins? >> i've been covering this from the beginning. i am more than aware of what is going on. the biggest issue here is the timing. when you look at the release, it said we need to do this quickly. if you're going to give us your best offer, give it to us right now because if you're not, we will close this eddie bauer d eal. that is what is happening now and they need the due diligence to increase the price to $65 and maybe more. it is not $65 in cash. it could be stock. men's wearhouse has the door open to close this transaction. activist fieldhe with ebay and paypal. is rattling the cages on almost a daily basis. he was on with me a couple of against pushing heavily the paypal spinoff. one thing he is trying to get investors to pay att
world and they're going to continue to do so. >> are we still in a low interest rate environment despite the fact the fed is tapering? is that your assessment? >> i am quite sure we'll will be in a low interest rate environment. confidence,more , westing more into equities brought in richard buxton and his team and he has ready well -- his ability and pounds his ability and pounds over the last six months. we're seeing people invest more. end of the day, you do not get much return if you've got cash or fixed interest. looks what can you do to counter that -- >> what can you do to counter that when yields remain low? what are you doing to counter that. >> we look at our customers and look at their risk tolerances and we decide -- designed to portfolios to meet those risks. if you're willing to take a bit more risks, they're our alternative products. we believe advice is really important for people. -- we are buying the largest network of restricted an independent financial advisers because we think our proposition is good for solutions. we believe we can expand our offering in the u.k.. >
in this environment. bitt made me a uncomfortable, to say the least. giantnkfully, the galapagos tortoise do not get excited about meal time. they can live months without food. because hee new 18 is going to live to 200. to cornices and lemurs, it shelters rare birds. >> doing very well. right here. >> i see him right there. it was once native to the area of the caribbean and when he moved here, there was not a single one left. >> because they are beautiful, they may have been killed for the feathers. >> branson has a big plan for them. >> once we have enough, we will move them on and hopefully, they will have scarlet ibis there. >> i would never leave. >> yeah. yeah. yeah. >> trish regan, bloomberg. >> whether animal or human. thethose listening on radio, the first word is up next. or our viewers, the pulse is back. we'll talk to the chief executive officer. our top story is that the ukraine is in crisis and we talked to the ukraine ambassador to the k -- the u.k. he seestalk about how this evolving. you can follow us on twitter. i know that there has been good stuff on cars and car pictures. we wi
being the low interest-rate environment. qwest also, companies are doing well. our corporate clients are doing nicely. >> are they willing to spend? you are an advertising guy. spends expected to grow by three or four percent. i think the uncertainty about the fiscal policy is --sing corporations >> what would give you more confidence that you know exactly what to expect about taxation policy and health care reform, etc.. there is no indication about what the final outcome would be. 70% of the business are outside of america. they are in china and russia and brazil. those markets are growing. each one differently, but china, i read yesterday, seven or eight percent growth in the economy. not nine or 10% of where it was. i do not see anything on the horizon. there is nothing on the horizon that gives you consternation and says the fundamentals of the --nomy >> the fed has been it's a much money. qwest we produced a surplus. you noticed the fiscal reform has been so uncertain. as a result, they cut expenses. the canadian mindset is you have to have a bounce budget. qwest we have john k
is already baked in? >> the obamacare regulatory environment is one element of the change in health care where the cost of health care will continue to go up and software is a fundamental way to address that. we have been very active selling companies to the larger participants as they look to build up rotter solutions. >> what other subsectors of tax are hot right now? >> infrastructure software broadly. like sapy solutions and oracle. i think you can see companies like ca trying to change itself or companies that have gone private that are trying to transform companies to deliver solutions into the small and medium-size companies in the marketplace. >> one of the stocks we like to talk about is tesla. morgan stanley doubled their price target. would you buy tesla? >> i'm a technology banker and a big car guy, so i love the stock, does it have the chops to develop the solutions that? that is an unknown. it's interesting at risk dollars that may lay out in a big way or may not. it?ould you buy >> no. >> a lot of analysts still have a bye on it. we are on the market again and 30 minutes.
total vehicl vehicle . the week wage environment is also a factor here. what is the bloomberg consensus forecast? >> we are expecting a 15.4 million pace of sales. as critical. at the end of january, we had inventory on the market. sustainable set around 65. one of the reasons we had the slowdown in production was not because of the weather. it has to do with the balance of supply. we need to see the pace of sales pick up substantially. my sense here is that the weather will inhibit that. eventually the automakers will have to put in some pretty big extensions to clear those inventories out. imagine, day before march, in april, will that number spike up a little? when people start getting tax returns back. >> that's what we are expecting. you'll get a little more cash on hand. this is the year many middle-income americans are going to see the tax on their interest reduced. they may get a little less. >> about 30 seconds left. non-manufacturing data. at richmond fed survey, what's a likely to tell us? >> it remains flat. retail is taking it on the chin. at thewill probably stay level. >>
halt. we have reports across the region. .t's a big week for china the economy and the environment top the agenda. we look ahead to the challenges they have to face. the oscars are under way right now. we are going to have details of who has won and who is not winning in l.a. we will have all that and more. >> kiev has put its military on full alert as russia heightens it grip on the crimea. the g7 has suspended preparations for the june summit in sochi. unidentified gunmen have , obama responded to putin and is sending his secretary of state to kiev today. >> what has already happened is a brazen act of aggression in violation of international law, in violation of the you in charter, in violation of the helsinki final act, in violation of the ukraine russia agreement. russia has engaged in a military act of aggression against another country. >> we are on the brink of disaster. there was not any reason for the russian federation to invade .kraine >> i am watching what we're seeing across the markets because of these geopolitical tensions in that part of the world. it is really abo
at only -- it looks ite any other ford, except has infrared lights that scan the environment than much the same way another would. creating a three-dimensional map of everything, making 2.5 million measurements every second. it means the car can accelerate, brake, or swerve without being told to. it is autonomous. >> there is a long way to go in that. the next big staff will be cars , road conditions and safety conditions. i suspect the technology will be there before the legislation that the driver is ready to accept it. >> ford aims to have them hit -- them on the road by the next few years. >> selling cars is a job that often carries a negative stigma, but there is one salesman who has found success in a life dealing wheels. >> there is not any car that i cannot supply within 40 hours. >> if you want a supercar, where do you go to buy one? mayfair might sound like a good place to start, or you could try behind these gates. >> is here that you will meet tom hartley, a school dropout who has been selling cars and see was 12 years old. his speciality is finding the high-performance car
environment. things happen. that tweet has nearly 3 million right now. they won. everyone won. samsung moved the bar forward as for the duration in a stylish way. ellen degeneres is a big social media queen appeared everyone is -- queen now. everyone is a winner. >> such an awesome moment there from the oscars. i thought she did pretty good. what do you think? >> i love her. pepsico was a sponsor. the pizza boxes have coca-cola logos on them. pepsi may not be so happy either. i like her spontaneity and vibe. >> great to see you. thank you so much for joining us. more executive shakeup at microsoft. we are going to talk about the changes and what they might mean nadella new ceo satya when we come back. ♪ >> welcome back to "bloomberg west." satya nadella is shuffling management and effort to reignite growth here at he is putting former political operative mark penn in the role of chief strategy officer. it is the most expensive for nadella yet. he was named ceo just last month. cory johnson is in new york. with me here is ari leavy. who is mark penn? >> a longtime political strategist. he w
? >> is always been a learning environment that i think the egg is part about it is meeting the people. 35,000 people who are early adopters. they are entrepreneurs and converge in this little funny place that is called austin, texas. it has become the place to meet people. one of the companies you will be looking for is atlas. this is about wearable technology? >> it is a big part of what is going on now. it is the buzz everywhere. atals is a great company because it really fits into the health category where we are trying to measure all of these things going on in our bodies and become more fit. all this take information about your exercise program and then you create graphs and you can track your progress, right? you can measured against your friends? >> really get into better shape. it is amazing how this company has such an amazing run and raised half $1 million already. me.3 and this is a different kind of investigation and health. tell us about it. >> they do dna testing. you mail it in and they could tell you a lot of things about your dna. you can learn where you came from, what d
modify aircrafts to make it more like a home environment. increaseden an emphasis on noise reduction in aircrafts. a sound level would only allow you to have good speech interaction within one feet of each other. we have 47 decibels. they communicate 16 feet easily. once it was identify that you could get lower, we rely, alessio far we can go. we apply a continuous and uninterrupted barrier of installation -- insulation. we isolate the component that passed through the barriers. we also have to treat the systems within the barrier already. ventilation fans and whatnot. it is about optimization. more we add, the more weight you add to the aircraft. this would be what would typically come on aircraft. but we develop an whole new only two thirds of the way, it is 10 decibels quieter or half the noise level. interior,f the basic it would be $25 million range. we will have a wide body aircraft. 747, that is just what we do from the interior completion standpoint. class coming up, the bank of nova scotia will be in the spotlight. we will speak to the ceo about the first-quarter earnings re
environment than it was in 2005 or 2006. i would hesitate to say it is over. >> let me ask you about the bay area. whenever i am here in new york i hear about silicon valley and you hear about the new silicon valley of texas. why is silicon valley continuing brightest, best and or is it? >> i think it is. at the five companies worth more than $5 billion in tech and you will find they all come from silicon valley. and then five in new york. it is a network effect. if you are a world-class engineer, where should you go? the overwhelming answer is silicon valley. and then as a result, the best executives are in silicon valley , the ones who know how to scale companies. is a predominant amount of money. the culture itself is very conducive. all of those things are designed to make it a very strong network effect. it is sort of like hollywood. how hard is it to make a movie. you can make a movie in idaho. grip,etting the best key you will not get someone as good as the guy in hollywood. that is who you are competing with, you start off at a disadvantage. what is the cultural? >> there is just tre
not want to hurt the environment. also look at sodastream. they hire a lot of employees, they are israeli engineers. this is a great example of how you focus on good things and grow the economy on both sides. >> the controversy was that scarlett johansson is the spokesperson and they have a factory that employs people took and offense to her sponsorship of this. is that a constant issue you have to deal with? >> luckily i focus on the good rings. i focus on innovation, creativity, and business. 1500 mbaing more than students from the top programs, all the top 20 programs in canada, spain, hong kong, beijing, they are interested in innovation. people are not so looking all the time about the bad things. onkily i am focused 100% that. >> companies like cisco and intel making investments in israel. you can mention google doing a lot of their innovative products and israel. are doing allked their innovative products in haifa. >> i want to thank you very much. the founder of the u.s.-israel does this -- business council. will be speaking with israel he prime minister benjamin netanyahu coming
in that environment. a lot of investors aren't used to this market. we think we are in the waning days. as interest rates are eroding those rates of return, you are zero. >> lets the were treasuries ended today. in the last hour, you have seen yields up higher. overall, it was a tight range for the market. they are not taking up very big additions. was a little rush into the treasury market. in terms of commodities, you have to look at oil here. moving on u.s. data, u.s. inventory is climbing for the seventh straight week. there's some weakness in the, the. refining capacity is down. they are transitioning from winter into spring. that affects the energy stocks. or on the markets, i'm alex feel. ♪
lived most of my life in this city, but being in this beautiful environment and that beautiful environment is different. it is not half bad. >> very politic. that's move on the big investment banks, from citigroup to jpmorgan, bracing for a slump in the first quarter that is not citigroup says that trading revenue will probably drop. the jpmorgan ceo, jamie dimon, said last week that revenue from fixed income is down 15%. putting this into perspective for us, joining us by phone, jason goldberg. jason, how much of this is priced in? >> we think a lot of it is. we think that we will see trading results coming out from citigroup and j.p. morgan. you see it every day in the marketplace in terms of volume. ,aybe lower than anticipated investors and risk mode for the last few weeks. >> you make a nice distinction this morning about the venezuela laws. volume, as youh mentioned? or is this about something that went wrong? >> alternately it tends to be a terms ofng quarter in trading. if you look at the linked quarter basis, we still think it will be up 25%, 35%. most banks are just c
months. quite how much longer can insurers endure this slow rate environment? it has to be painful. >> having said that, not all insurers are in the same position. zurich, we are starting to prepare for a low-interest environment. we came off of it in 2008, we had to make little changes to profitability. we chose to defend it, that was a very strong managing good we have less sensibility to low-interest rates than other countries, which probably will have more challenging times ahead. short interest rates continue to remain where they are. in other words, moving into a japanese scenario. thatarting to dustin and -- infrastructure of real estate. would you take more risk on so-called hard assets if you could? >> as part of my strategy for the economy, considering all of the assets, i would take moderately more risk. when you do that, we have also decided to move a part of our liquid assets into lesly quit assets. talking about infrastructure, i --uld dress that the world stressed that the world takes infrastructure loans, and some of the more risky assets modestly increase our quart
. you have comcast in the future trying to get through the regulatory environment eyeing time warner because they want to have a broadband capacity. they want to have the pipes. what is the impact of all this with increasingly video as an important part of what the internet is about? >> we want to have as much competition as we can in infrastructure. we may not have enough. the concerns about time warner and comcast are about who is the competitor. google fiber is present in four cities. we want as much competition as possible. >> how does it work? in my home state, asheville is one of the cities. >> the simple answer is the fiber is run to the poll or the curb and for a small fee, you pay to get it connected. if you want slow speed connectivity which is about five megabits, we will give it to you free for seven years. most people like to pay the roughly equivalent internet connection fees they do today and they get almost one gigabit speed up and down. it is revolutionary. >> in terms they have not seen anything like it. >> the speed is so much greater. are people clamoring for this
of understanding what the environment can do to him. and i think that is the sort of psychological difficulty. psychological warfare, psychological drama in all of this. this has been such a remarkable experience, you know? one of the most amazing -- the most amazing experience i have had as an actor. of rest.st takes a bit just enjoying opening the film and showing it to people. and i feel like there is still so much to say about it, that it is not a film you open and then get tired of the conversation about it. i think it does really still inform me. >> transformational character -- every actor's dream. the next nominees for best actor talked about the unique opportunity to take that on. leonardo dicaprio plays a real-life stockbroker in "the wolf of wall street." many say it is his most compelling performance. and in "nebraska," bruce dern has taken what he calls the role of a lifetime. he is woody grant, an aging maverick in a road trip across the northwest with his son. >> i knew i had waited a long time to get into position in my age group of guys for that kind of role could come my way
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